SU2C Scientific Research Teams

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Patricia M. LoRusso, D.O.

Scientific Research Team:
SU2C-MRA Dream Team: Personalized Medicine for Patients with BRAF Wild-Type (BRAFwt) Cancer

Patricia M. LoRusso, D.O.

Patricia M. LoRusso, D.O., is director of the Eisenberg Center for Experimental Therapeutics, principal investigator for the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute’s National Cancer Institute (NCI)-UO1-funded phase I program, and professor of medicine at Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University School of Medicine.

LoRusso graduated from Michigan State University School of Osteopathic Medicine in 1981. After residency, she completed a fellowship in medical oncology in December of 1988, with a focus on developmental therapeutics. She joined the faculty at Wayne State University School of Medicine in January of 1989. As a result of her focus on early therapeutics, she has come to be recognized as an international expert in the field of phase I clinical research with a focus on novel trial design.

LoRusso currently serves as co-chair of the NCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) Investigational Drug Steering Committee. She has also served on the scientific committee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the education and scientific committees of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and has served as a member on several NCI and other peer-reviewed granting committees. For several years she has served on the faculty of AACR-supported clinical trials workshops including the Vail and Flims courses.

Last year LoRusso was awarded the American College of Osteopathic Internists Researcher of the Year Award. She was awarded the Hero of Breast Cancer award in 2009. In 2008, she was named one of Crain’s Detroit Business Health Care Heroes, was recognized with the 2008 Michaele C. Christian Oncology Drug Development Award and Lectureship from NCI CTEP, and received the Marygrove College Distinguished Alumni Award. LoRusso was also awarded the Bennett J. Cohen Educational Leadership Award for Medical Research in 2004.

Innovate Collaborate Accelerate
A one percent reduction in cancer deaths would be worth $500 billion, almost 2.5 times what the U.S. spends each year on the disease.