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SU2C Scientific Research Teams

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Eric J. Small, M.D.

Scientific Research Team:
Eric J. Small, M.D.

Eric J. Small, M.D.

Small is professor of medicine and urology and chief of the division of hematology and oncology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He is also deputy director and director of clinical sciences in the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Small has served on the NCI Prostate Cancer Progress Review Group, and is associate editor of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, where he is responsible for genitourinary oncology. He served as the scientific program committee chair of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2004. Additionally, he was a co-founder, and subsequently chaired the First Annual Multidisciplinary Clinical Prostate Cancer Symposium, jointly co-sponsored by ASCO, ASTRO, the SUO and the PCF, which has since evolved into the Multidisciplinary Genitourinary Oncology Symposium. Small has served as chair of the Genitourinary Committee of the alliance (formerly the Cancer and Leukemia Group B, CALGB), a NCI Cooperative Group since 2000.

Small has contributed a significant body of work to the understanding of advanced prostate cancer, with themes involving the transition from hormone-sensitive to treatment-resistant prostate cancer (TRPC), the development of androgen receptor-directed therapies, the development of risk assessment tools for patients with advanced prostate cancer, and prostate cancer immunotherapy. Small was directly involved in the FDA approval of three agents relevant to prostate cancer (from first-in-man studies, to completed phase III trials and FDA approval): sipuleucel T, abiraterone and ipilimumab — approved for melanoma.

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