SU2C Scientific Research Teams

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Dennis Slamon, M.D., Ph.D.

Scientific Research Team:
An Integrated Approach to Targeting Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Their Resistance Phenotype

Dennis Slamon, M.D., Ph.D.

Dennis Slamon, M.D., Ph.D., serves as director of clinical/translational research at University of California, Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and director of the Revlon/UCLA Women’s Cancer Research Program. He is a professor of medicine, chief of the division of hematology/oncology and executive vice chair for research in the UCLA Department of Medicine. Slamon is also the director of the medical advisory board for the National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance.

In 1975, Slamon graduated with honors from the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine with both his medical degree and his doctorate in cell biology. He completed his internship and residency at the University of Chicago Hospitals and Clinics, and became chief resident in 1978. One year later, he became a fellow in the division of hematology/oncology at UCLA.

For more than 20 years, Slamon has devoted his life to research that has brought about a revolution in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. His clinical research led to the development of trastuzumab (Herceptin), a breakthrough drug that has been shown to extend the survival of women with a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer.

Slamon has won numerous research awards, including the Warren Alpert Foundation Scientific Prize, the 2007 Gairdner Foundation International Award, the Translational Medicine Award by the USCD-Salk Institute, the Bristol-Myers Squibb Oncology Millennium Award, and the Dorothy P. Landon-AACR Prize for Translational Cancer Research. In 2004, the American Cancer Society presented him with the Medal of Honor, the top award bestowed by the organization.

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This year, approximately 1.65 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer and about 585,720 will die of the disease.